Barry Orscheln

The chairman and CEO of Orscheln Industries, Barry Orscheln, was recently confirmed to sit on the four-person Missouri Conservation Commission which serves to benefit wildlife conservation efforts in the state.

The chairman and CEO of Orscheln Industries, Barry Orscheln, was recently confirmed to sit on the 4-person Missouri Conservation Commission which serves to benefit wildlife conservation efforts in the state.

The Missouri Conservation Commission approves wildlife code regulations, considers strategic planning and is involved in budget development for the Missouri Department of Conservation. Commission members do not receive a salary.

Barry Orscheln was appointed by Gov. Mike Parson on Feb. 28 and was confirmed by the Missouri Senate on April 4.

Orscheln is the chairman and CEO of Orscheln Industries which is a third-generation business that employees more than 3,500 people and is headquartered in Moberly, Missouri. The Orscheln group of diversified companies is engaged in manufacturing, retail and commercial real estate development.

Orscheln was born and raised in Moberly and has been an avid hunter and angler since he was young. His father and uncle owned a farm where they grew crops and had horses.

"I did a lot of hunting and fishing there but I also traveled to other places," Orscheln said. "We're not that far from Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge and I went there to hunt. That's how I grew up."

He said he began his career with the company in 1977 and has served as its CEO for the past 29 years. He graduated from Central Methodist College in 1972 with degrees in Business Administration and Economics.

Orscheln has also served as chairman of the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission, chairman of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and as director of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Food and Agriculture Committee.

He said a goal of the conservation department is to provide outdoor opportunities for future generations.

“Learning to hunt and fish, respecting our outdoors, and being mindful of conservation were very important to my early years and remain very important for kids today and for future generations,” Orscheln said. “Teaching kids to respect and value our fish, forests, and wildlife -- especially at a young age — will stick with them for rest of their lives. I want my children and grandchildren to have the same outdoor opportunities I had and to be able to enjoy a wealth and variety of outdoor activities like I did.”

Orscheln said he has enjoyed being outdoors and has hunted a wide variety of wildlife including squirrels, rabbit, deer, ducks and geese.

"I've always known the Missouri Department of Conservation to be a very well organized and well managed agency," Orscheln said. "It is one more opportunity for me to help serve the state of Missouri."

As a commissioner, Orscheln joins Marilynn J. Bradford of Jefferson City, David W. Murphy of Columbia and Don C. Bedell of Sikeston.