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Wind farm affected

local wildlife

I would like to share observations about wildlife attracted to our farm. We have two ponds that used to attract geese and ducks, and I prefer to hunt on our farm. We are the fourth generation family to actively farm this ground since 1868. We now live next to a cluster of wind turbines operated as Osborn Wind Energy LLC.

The migratory birds have changed their flight path over this area. They avoid it. We used to have hundreds of geese and ducks feed and rest overnight here. There was a local flock of geese that fed in our ponds and pastures as well. Those migratory flocks now fly outside the wind towers’ footprint to find safe harbor elsewhere. The local numbers are greatly diminished.

Farmers depend on bats to help manage the insect population in their fields. The trees where they roost have been bulldozed out. The effect of the wind turbine blades on bats is fatal without striking them. The pressure differential of passing turbine blades experienced by a bat ruptures their thin membranes. I used to watch bats at night catch insects attracted to the pole light. I have not seen bats since shortly after these wind turbines were erected.

The deer, turkey and upland game are gone or greatly reduced in this area. They do not tolerate the shadow flicker and noises made by turbines and their blades very well. There are fewer woodlots and parcels set aside to support game. The number of eagles I have seen from our fields has decreased because their preferred diet is rarely available.

Your readers should worry about what they will lose, not what they will gain, if wind turbines come to Buchanan County.

Glenn Dyer

Stewartsville, Missouri

Choose your words

To the Persisterhood, if you want to connect to locals in the backward parts of the Midwest, try using words like promote, announce or proclaim instead of promulgate. How about permit, allow or accept instead of acquiesce.

If your point was to prove you are smarter than all of us, well done. If your point was to prove you are one of us, you failed.

It is no wonder we are called the flyover states.

John Byrne

St. Joseph