DOJ appointee releases new plan for 'tenuous' Jackson water

FILE - Ted Henifin, left, the City of Jackson water system third-party administrator, addresses media questions during a news conference at City Hall as Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba listens on Dec. 5, 2022, in Jackson, Miss. A bill before the Mississippi Legislature that would transfer the capital city's troubled water system to a new regional entity could be motivated by a desire by state officials to access a large pot of federal dollars earmarked for the city, according to Henifin, Jackson's federally appointed water operator said Wednesday.

Jackson, Miss. (AP) — A bill before the Mississippi Legislature that would transfer the capital city's troubled water system to a new regional entity could be motivated by a desire by state officials to access a large pot of federal dollars earmarked for the city, Jackson's federally appointed water operator said Wednesday.

The legislation advancing in the state Senate proposes the eventual transfer of water, wastewater and storm water services provided by Jackson, a Democratic-led city, to a new regional entity's “ownership, management and control.”

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