China US Trade

In this April 2018 photo, packets of raw soybeans are placed on a table at a U.S. soybean company’s booth at the international soybean exhibition in Shanghai, China. China has announced some U.S. industrial chemicals will be exempt from tariff hikes imposed in a trade war with Washington but maintained penalties on soybeans, pork and other farm goods.

BEIJING — China on Wednesday announced it will exempt American industrial grease and some other imports from tariff hikes in a trade war with Washington but kept in place penalties on soybeans and other major U.S. exports ahead of negotiations next month.

The move applies to raw materials for farmers and factories, suggesting Beijing wants to limit damage to its slowing economy from the fight with President Donald Trump over trade and technology.

It adds to indications that both sides might be settling in for extended conflict even as they prepare for talks in Washington aimed at ending the dispute that threatens global economic growth.

A list of 16 items including lubricants, fish meal for animal feed and some other chemicals will be exempt from penalties of up to 25% imposed in response to Trump’s tariff hikes on Chinese products, the Ministry of Finance said.

Punitive duties on soybeans, the biggest U.S. export to China, and thousands of other items were left unchanged.

“The exemption could be seen as a gesture of sincerity toward the U.S. ahead of negotiations in October but is probably more a means of supporting the economy,” Iris Pang of ING said in a report.

Word that talks are going ahead has helped calm jittery financial markets. But there has been no sign of progress.

The two governments “are unlikely to reach a deal this year,” said Pang.

Beijing’s earlier tariff hikes avoided processor chips and other U.S. technology required by Chinese industry.

Chinese leaders are resisting U.S. pressure to roll back plans for government-led creation of global competitors in robotics and other industries.

Washington, Europe, Japan and other trading partners say those plans violate China’s market-opening commitments and are based on stealing or pressuring companies to hand over technology.