Placeholder Business

GM recalls Chevrolet small SUVs; suspension welds can break

DETROIT | General Motors is recalling more than 107,000 small SUVs in the U.S. and Canada because a suspension weld can break and cause steering problems.

The recall covers the 2015 through 2018 Chevrolet Trax.

Documents posted Friday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration an improperly welded joint can break, increasing the risk of a crash.

It’s an expansion of a recall from April that covered the 2017 through 2019 model years.

Dealers will inspect the left and right front lower-control arms and replace them if needed. No date has been set for the recall to begin.

U.S. opens probe of problems in Jeep Wranglers

DETROIT | U.S. safety regulators are investigating complaints of steering problems in about 270,000 SUVs made by Fiat Chrysler.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it granted a consumer’s petition asking for a probe into 2018 and 2019 Jeep Wranglers.

The agency said more than 3,500 owners have complained to the company and government about frame weld problems or steering issues including a shimmy or wobble, looseness, or locking up. No crashes or injuries have been reported.

The Wrangler was recalled last year for misaligned welds that could cause steering problems. The government will determine if another recall is needed.

Colt suspends production of AR-15 for civilian market

WEST HARTFORD, Conn. | Gun-maker Colt is suspending its production of rifles for the civilian market including the popular AR-15, the company said Thursday in a shift it attributed to changes in consumer demand and a market already saturated with similar weapons.

The company said it will focus instead on fulfilling contracts with military and police customers for rifles.

“The fact of the matter is that over the last few years, the market for modern sporting rifles has experienced significant excess manufacturing capacity,” Colt’s chief executive officer, Dennis Veilleux, said in a written statement. “Given this level of manufacturing capacity, we believe there is adequate supply for modern sporting rifles for the foreseeable future.”

Veilleux said the company, which emerged from bankruptcy in 2016, remains committed to the Second Amendment. He said the company is expanding its lines of pistols and revolvers.

— From AP reports