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Another school district sues leading e-cigarette maker Juul

AVA, Mo. | Another school district is suing leading e-cigarette maker Juul, claiming that its devices create “enormous distractions for students.”

The Springfield News-Leader reported that the Ava R-1 School District in southwest Missouri filed an 80-page lawsuit on Oct. 31 in federal court. The suit claims the company marketed its products to teenagers and got a new generation of young people addicted to nicotine.

Ava Superintendent Jason Dial said the district has rolled out a comprehensive prevention plan to stem the rise in e-cigarette among students.

Several other school districts also are suing, including the Francis Howell School District in suburban St. Louis and several in the Kansas City area. Juul has said it doesn’t market to youth and its products are meant to be an alternative to smoking.

No. 1 milk company declares bankruptcy

Dean Foods, America’s biggest milk processor, filed for bankruptcy Tuesday amid a steep, decades-long drop-off in U.S. milk consumption blamed on soda, juices and, more recently, nondairy substitutes.

The Dallas company said it may sell itself to the Dairy Farmers of America, a marketing cooperative owned by thousands of farmers.

Since 1975, the amount of milk consumed per capita in America has tumbled more than 40%, a slide attributed to a number of reasons but mostly the rise of so many other choices, including teas, sodas, juices and almond and soy milk.

Another blow to Dean Foods came when Walmart opened its own milk processing plant in Indiana last year.

Special South African gin is infused with elephant dung

MOSSEL BAY, South Africa | The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick.

The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it.

Tthey collect the dung themselves, using their bare hands.

The droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind.

Those botanicals are then sterilized and dried again. Eventually, the remains are infused in the gin, which they say gives the spirit a wooded, spicy, earthy taste.

— From AP reports