Across U.S., police, protesters clash in violent weekend

ATLANTA | Protests took a violent turn in several U.S. cities over the weekend with demonstrators squaring off against federal agents outside a courthouse in Portland, Oregon, forcing police in Seattle to retreat into a station house and setting fire to vehicles in California and Virginia.

A protest against police violence in Austin, Texas, turned deadly when police said a protester was shot and killed by a person who drove through a crowd of marchers. And someone was shot and wounded in Aurora, Colorado, after a car drove through a protest there, authorities said.

ProPublica posts records, bypassing judge’s blockade

NEW YORK | Days after a federal judge paused the public release of New York City police disciplinary records, a news website has published a database containing complaint information for thousands of officers.

ProPublica posted the database Sunday, explaining in a note to readers that it isn’t obligated to comply with Judge Katherine Polk Failla’s temporary restraining order because it is not a party to a union lawsuit challenging the release of such records.

Deputy Managing Editor Eric Umansky said ProPublica requested the information from the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, soon after last month’s repeal of state law that for decades had prevented the disclosure of disciplinary records.

Efforts underway to remove statues of colonialists

As many in the Lower 48 call for statues of Confederate leaders to be removed amid a national reckoning on race, some Alaska residents are conducting a similar movement demanding statues tied to colonization be eliminated or relocated.

A statue of Russian colonialist Alexander Baranov will be taken out of public view in one city and petitions are circulating calling for the removal of statues dedicated to former U.S. Secretary of State and Alaska purchase architect William Seward and Capt. James Cook, who has been credited with discovering land already inhabited by Indigenous people.

Indigenous people and others who signed petitions to remove those statues perceive them as symbols of colonialism, oppression and white supremacy, said Rosita Worl, president of the Sealaska Heritage Institute.

Reporter credits viewer with noticing cancerous lump

TAMPA, Fla. | A television news reporter in Florida is crediting an eagle-eyed viewer for noticing a lump on her neck. Victoria Price, a reporter for WFLA in Tampa, followed the advice and was diagnosed with cancer.

Price tweeted that she is undergoing surgery on Monday to remove the tumor, her thyroid and a couple of lymph nodes.

Price, 28, an investigative reporter, said this week that her television station’s catchphrase is “8 On Your Side.”

“I will be forever grateful for the woman who went out of her way to email me, a total stranger. She had zero obligation to, but she did anyway. Talk about being on your side, huh?” Price said.

Church volunteer admits to arson attack on cathedral

PARIS | French authorities detained and charged a repentant church volunteer Sunday after he told investigators that he was responsible for an arson attack that badly damaged a 15th-century Gothic cathedral.

The man had previously been questioned and then released after the July 18 blaze that destroyed the organ, shattered stained-glass windows, and blackened the insides of the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul of the western French city of Nantes.

— From AP reports