EXTRACTION

Rudhraksh Jaiswal (left) and Chris Hemsworth (right) star in “Extraction.”

One day, Hollywood will make a non-”Thor”-related movie that can balance his comic charm with his muscular, action star-ready exterior.

Until that happens, we’ll have him starring as either as a personality-free, brooding force like this movie and “12 Strong” or a handsome buffoon in mediocre comedies like “Men In Black: International” and “Vacation.”

Continuing the trend of putting stunt coordinators in the director’s chair, similar to the “John Wick” series and “Atomic Blonde,” “Avengers: Endgame” stuntman Sam Hargrave reunites with Hemsworth to have him stabbing, shooting and kicking through villains in India as mercenary Tyler Rake.

With his future telegraphed within the first five minutes of meeting him, Rake is a suicidal killing machine, haunted by the fuzzy memories of his late son, who died from lymphoma. There’s nothing more that he wants than a quick death for himself. But if he’s going to be alive, he might as well make some money off killing other people.

Rake gets a deal to help save Ovi (Rudraksh Jaiswal), the son of an international crime lord, from a tyrannical drug leader who has him in his crosshairs. He can’t refuse the money and as Ovi and he are forced to team up against a torrent of disposable bad guys, they find out their backgrounds aren’t that uncommon.

“Extraction” is likely the 10,000th version of this story and it has no ambitions of adding any new twists or different characters dynamics. Hemsworth is a meathead who broods, and Jaiswal’s warm presence is there to soften him up. This whole thing would be more interesting as a video game than it is a movie.

Like the “Wick” and “Atomic Blonde” films showed off some kinetic, jaw-dropping action sequences, this does the same. There are several amazing scenes in the middle of the film that act like a sweet surprise in this mediocre sandwich. The camera zooms alongside well-choreographed car chases and swivels around its main characters as they blast through a narrow hallway of bad guys. If this is Hargrave’s audition for a new “John Wick” movie, consider him hired.

Those scenes aside, neither Hargrave, Hemsworth or Jaiswal can save a boring, predictable screenplay by Joe Russo (famous for co-directing several Marvel movies). If Russo’s trying to bring back the feeling of the unstoppable tough-guy-led movies from the ’80s and ’90s, like Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Commando” or Bruce Willis’s “Die Hard,” it would have been worth remembering that those films had more than just awesome scenes of bloody mayhem, they also had personality.

Andrew Gaug can be reached at andrew.gaug@newspressnow.com. Follow him on Twitter: @NPNOWGaug