Giants trade cornerback Eli Apple to Saints

The New York Giants have sent “the other Eli” to the New Orleans Saints.

Not Eli Manning. Eli Apple.

The Giants on Tuesday traded the cornerback who was the 10th pick overall in the 2016 draft to the Saints for a fourth-round pick in 2019 and a seventh-rounder in 2020.

Like all trades, it will not be official until Apple passes a physical.

The move marks the second time in a week the Giants (1-6) have parted ways with a recent first-round draft pick. Last week, they waived tackle Ereck Flowers, their 2015 top pick. He was signed by Jacksonville.

It also could be a sign the Giants, who were 3-13 last season, might deal more assets with the NFL trading deadline set for 4 p.m. on Oct. 30.

Coach Pat Shurmur said the Giants are constantly evaluating their roster, and he felt they got good value for Apple.

“I think if you remember back, Eli was out with an injury when we beat Houston and B.W. Webb played in his spot against two fine receivers,” Shurmur said late Tuesday afternoon. “So we’re not throwing in the towel.”

Shurmur is convinced Manning, who has been under the microscope, will be his quarterback when the trading deadline is over.

Bolt excluded from Mariners practice

GOSFORD, Australia | Usain Bolt has been excluded from team practice with the Central Coast Mariners after his management rejected a contract offer.

The eight-time Olympic gold medalist has been on an indefinite trial period with the A-League club since August in a bid to become a professional football player.

He scored two goals in a trial game but wasn’t included in the squad for the A-League season opener last weekend, when Central Coast had a 1-1 draw in Brisbane. Mariners coach Mike Mulvey said he wasn’t aware the club had made an offer to Bolt.

The Mariners are in talks with Bolt’s agent, Ricky Simms, but have said “without the financial contribution of an external third-party, it is unlikely that Usain Bolt and the Central Coast Mariners will agree to terms.”

Esport betting platform gets license for gambling

Video gamers in the United States and elsewhere will soon be able to bet on themselves.

The live-betting esports platform Unikrn had its wagering license approved by the Isle of Man on Tuesday, clearing the way for users to legally gamble on competitive video games.

“There is finally a legitimate, regulated operator in the space that has a pretty comprehensive offering,” Unikrn CEO Rahul Sood told The Associated Press. “It’s huge.”

Unikrn immediately began rolling out to 20 countries a variety of online products, and will soon bring esports wagering to most of Europe, South Korea and other Asian countries, and parts of Latin America. Certain types of esports betting will also be available in the U.S.

Kawase named to direct 2020 Tokyo Olympic documentary

TOKYO | Japanese director Naomi Kawase, named Tuesday to make a documentary film about the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, said she hopes to focus on reconstruction efforts in the northern Fukushima region of the country.

The area was devastated in 2011 by an earthquake and tsunami and a resulting nuclear disaster. The Japanese government hopes the Olympics will show the region is recovering and that products made there are safe.

Some Olympic softball and baseball games will be played there to showcase the region.

“This will be an opportunity for me to show the world where Japan stands and what kind of changes Japan will be undergoing,” Kawase said through an interpreter.

She said she also hoped to focus on volunteers at the Olympics.

“I think this really fits with the Japanese spirit of giving and contributing,” she said.

Kawase is highly acclaimed and became the youngest director to receive the Camera d’Or prize at the Cannes Film Festival with her 1997 film “Suzaku.”

Her best known recent films are “Sweet Bean” and “Still the Water.”

The Tokyo documentary will be financed by the International Olympic Committee and the local organizing committee, and is a requirement under the hosting contract.

Toshiro Muto, the CEO of the Tokyo organizing committee, said the IOC owns the copyright to the film and “has the right to make key decisions in the creation of the film.”

The documentary of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics by Kon Ichikawa, titled “Tokyo Olympiad,” is generally regarded as one of the most important in the genre, along with Leni Riefenstahl’s “Olympia” from the 1936 Berlin Games.

Ichikawa’s film was controversial at the time and unsettled organizers who wanted a more traditional treatment of the Olympics rather than Ichikawa’s more poetic view.

A Japanese reporter, posing a question to Kawase, described her typical film as “quiet and slow-flowing.” He then asked how this approach suited something “fast moving” like the Olympics.

She said her style was unlikely to change, and then questioned assumptions about what an Olympic film should look like.

“When it comes to the Tokyo Olympics, we cannot just say it will be speedy just because it’s a sports-related theme,” she said.

In a statement, the IOC said Kawase will be only the fifth woman to direct the official Olympic film. She said she hoped to help make a path for women in Japan and for other female film makers.

“It’s a fact I am a woman, so I will create from my own standpoint, from the perspective of a female,” she said.

Kawase said she did not have a title for the film, which is likely to be finished in the spring of 2021.

“At this point I don’t have any idea at all,” she said. “But as usual I think this is something that will suddenly come to me.”

—From AP reports