JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — A ballot measure allowing the use of medical marijuana with an emphasis on helping veterans has passed, but two other medical marijuana measures were turned down.

Missouri voters on Tuesday approved Amendment 2, a ballot measure backed by a coalition of patients, doctors and veterans called New Approach Missouri. It was one of three unrelated medical marijuana measures on the ballot.

Under Amendment 2, post-traumatic stress disorder is among the conditions that qualify for use of medical marijuana, along with cancer and other serious illnesses. A 4 percent sales tax will go to a newly-created fund for health and care services for veterans. The sales tax revenue also will be used to administer licensing of medical marijuana businesses.

Voters turned down Amendment 3, which would have included a 15 percent tax to create a new state institute to research “presently incurable diseases.” The effort was largely self-funded by Springfield doctor and attorney Brad Bradshaw.

Also defeated was Proposition C, which would have imposed a 2 percent tax on the sale of medical marijuana.

Amendment 1

Amendment 1, the so-called “Clean Missouri” measure, requires the demographer to draw legislative boundaries based on the 2020 Census using criteria intended to achieve partisan fairness. Maps will be submitted for approval to bipartisan commissions, which will have less leeway than in the past to draft their own plans.

The measure also limits lobbyist gifts to lawmakers, makes legislative records open to the public, lowers campaign contribution limits for legislative candidates and lengthens the time lawmakers must wait after leaving office before becoming lobbyists.

State auditor

Democrat Nicole Galloway will continue to be the only Democrat elected to a statewide office in state government, after defeating Republican Saundra McDowell in Tuesday’s election.

Galloway was appointed auditor by then-Gov. Jay Nixon in 2015 after the death of Tom Schweich. Before that she served as Boone County treasurer.

Proposition D

Missouri voters have turned down a proposal that would have raised the state’s gas tax to help pay for road and bridge improvements.

Proposition D, voted down on Tuesday, would have increased the state’s 17-cent-per-gallon tax, which is among the lowest in the nation, by 10 cents a gallon. In addition to road and bridge repairs, the money would have helped fund the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

Minimum wage

Minimum wage workers in Missouri soon will get a boost in pay after voters on Tuesday approved a plan to gradually raise the wage to $12 an hour.

The current minimum wage in Missouri is $7.85 an hour. Proposition B will require the wage to rise to $8.60 an hour in 2019 and gradually increase to $12 an hour by 2023.

Bingo

Missouri voters also approved a constitutional amendment that changes the experience necessary to run a bingo game.